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Physiotherapy

About Physiotherapy

About Physiotherapy

Physiotherapy is a science-based methodology that is constantly evolving as new research discovers better ways to treat your body. Your physiotherapist will use their expert knowledge of the human body and highly specialised skills to help restore your aching, stiff and dysfunctional muscles and joints back to health.

Physiotherapists promote good health by encouraging their clients or patients to improve and increase control over their own lives through additional exercise prescription.

Physiotherapy focuses on treating the structural components of the body, such as muscles, joints and ligaments, looking at relative strength vs weakness, tightness and laxity vs length. They also look at the motor control of the movements which is controlled by the nervous system and help to re-educate normal movement patterns.

Physiotherapy is a science-based methodology that is constantly evolving as new research discovers better ways to treat your body. Your physiotherapist will use their expert knowledge of the human body and highly specialised skills to help restore your aching, stiff and dysfunctional muscles and joints back to health.

Physiotherapists promote good health by encouraging their clients or patients to improve 

and increase control over their own lives through additional exercise prescription.

Physiotherapy focuses on treating the structural components of the body, such as muscles, joints and ligaments, looking at relative strength vs weakness, tightness and laxity vs length. They also look at the motor control of the movements which is controlled by the nervous system and help to re-educate normal movement patterns.

What do Physiotherapists do?

A physiotherapist uses natural physical approaches and manual techniques to promote, maintain and restore your body to health and well-being so that you can perform and enjoy your chosen sport, work or everyday activities.

Our private physiotherapy clinic in Singapore uses a variety of physio treatment techniques, including:

Hands-on Treatment

At City Osteopathy & Physiotherapy, our emphasis is hands-on application for our patients. From gentle manipulation and massage to trigger point therapy, myofascial release and stretching, our manual physio techniques help you return to full, pain-free movement as soon as possible.

Exercise

Physical activity and stretching are two of the most fundamental principles of our physiotherapy clinic. When you come in for a consultation, your physiotherapist will identify and discuss any issues to keep you informed before formulating an appropriate plan that best fits your needs. Each exercise is suggested for you as an individual to help build core strength, mobility, function, stability, and balance. Such an approach helps speed up the recovery process and lower the risk of recurrence.

Education and Communication

Understanding the problem, its cause, and the best way to manage it makes a big difference when you are faced with a physical condition of any kind. Your physiotherapist will give you the information you need to manage symptoms and lead a life free of pain and dysfunction.

Whilst a physiotherapist specialises in the musculoskeletal system, the field includes an extensive understanding of the body as a whole and how everything is linked together.

Treatment Overview

FAQs

How much does it cost to see an Physiotherapist?

Our Physiotherapy standard rates are:

30-45 min Initial Consultation & Treatment: SGD 180.00
30-45 min Follow Up Treatment: SGD 160.00
30-45 min Home Visit: $480

What happens in a Physiotherapy treatment session?

In Physiotherapy, treatment will vary depending on the problem and individual. It may consist of soft tissue and joint mobilisation techniques to relieve acute symptoms, as well as techniques to address the root cause of symptoms and teaching of techniques for self-help. Strapping can be used, but advice and home exercises are prescribed to be able to continue progress in between appointments.

What does physiotherapy training involve?

Physiotherapy training is now a University based Bachelors or Masters degree course (previously hospital based diploma). This involves either three or four years extensive training studying the human body, particularly the muscle and joint system. It involves studying anatomy, physiology, biomechanics, the nervous system, psychology, medical conditions and disease processes, musculoskeletal conditions, exercise prescription and electrotherapy.

Initially on qualification, many Physiotherapists will have a rotational job within a hospital, this gives them a broad knowledge of other specialities which are useful to recognize in musculoskeletal settings such as neurology, rheumatology, orthopaedics, paediatrics and others.

It is a professional requirement that they continue their professional development throughout their career and Physiotherapists are constantly furthering their education by attending specialist courses and keeping abreast of current concepts and research development. These new concepts, developments and techniques will be continuously applied, as appropriate, to practice procedures and techniques to ensure they are giving their patients the best possible treatment. Many go on to extend their normal practice by becoming specialists working with elite sports or performing roles, in conjunction with the Orthopaedic medical profession that would have traditionally been the medical domain, such as ordering MRI’s, X rays and blood tests. This is to aid in diagnosis of musculoskeletal conditions and exclude other conditions.

What are the origins of physiotherapy?

Physiotherapy was first documented in Greek history when the use of massage was proposed and also Hydrotherapy (exercises in water). However, the current profession started to evolve in the early 19th century in Sweden, using massage, manipulation and exercise . The first formalised Physiotherapy society was set up by some nurses in the UK who recognized the need for an independent profession. Schools opened in the UK, New Zealand and the USA in the early 20th century. Physiotherapy really gained recognition and became established after the First World War, treating injured soldiers with remedial exercises and also using exercise to help treat disabled children suffering from Polio. It has worked alongside the medical profession and therefore its benefit to patients has been recognized since this time.

The profession developed over the 20th century. Manipulative techniques started to be used in the 1950’s and then with the progression of technology and computers in the 1980’s, electrotherapy, ultrasound, muscle stimulation and other devices were introduced. There has subsequently been a move towards manual therapy again but the profession is constantly looking to the latest research to lead and support its work and is constantly evolving in keeping with the latest evidence in medical science.

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